Organicallygrowngroup's Blog


The Better Cotton Initiative

You may come across the Better Cotton Initiative. Reportedly, prominent companies are jumping on the Better Cotton Initiative bandwagon. According to the following link, http://assets.wwf.ch/downloads/qa_shortfacts_cotton.pdf, dated August 2009, the Better Cotton Initiative, at this time, included the use of cotton grown from genetically modified seeds. One can argue the benefits and detriments of genetically modified seeds.

At Organically Grown, we have nothing to do with the Better Cotton Initiative. When the BCI standard is organic, we will support their efforts. We are committed to providing our customers with 100% certified organic cotton, made without the use of pesticides and GMOs.

BY BOB STEIN, CO-FOUNDER OF ORGANICALLY GROWN



New Reasons to Love Organic Cotton

As if we didn’t have enough reasons to love the softness of eco friendly organic cotton, Suite 101’s Kara Smith has come up with NEW reasons to love organic cotton. Smith encourages readers to continue to support the efforts of organic cotton farmers by regularly purchasing organic products. The article is spurred on by the fact that the organic cotton market dipped between 2007 and 2009, but has increased in 2010. It is essential for the organic cotton farmers that this upward trend in buying continue to increase.

Smith also notes that there are statistics which show that having a baby or a young child increased the awareness of buying organic. Parents who might not buy organic for themselves want the best, healthiest options for their children, and do not want them dressed in clothes that may have been sprayed with harsh chemicals and pesticides. Smith writes, “It might be safe to say that if the Earth were a baby, most of the crops it’d be wrapped in would be organic.”

Thankfully, by Summer 2010, organic cotton in California has reached a market price which makes it profitable for farmers to grow or switch to organic cotton. As long as customers continue to purchase organic cotton products, the demand will make sure that the farmers are able to economically produce organic cotton.

In conclusion, Smith reminds readers of several facts about organic cotton:

-Organic fruit and vegetables are higher in antioxidants – somewhere between 19 and 58% higher.

-Cotton farming uses approximately 3 billion dollars of pesticide which is poured onto the planet each year.

-Organic cotton is farmed without pesticides and are therefore free from residues which can actually stay in the cotton even after washing.

-Groundwater contaminated with pesticide residues does seep into drinking water and is not ‘washed out’ in treatment plants as there is no found treatment, yet, that can eliminate these residues.

BY EMILY LAIRD, DIRECTOR OF NEW MEDIA, ORGANICALLY GROWN